Global Hockey Camps
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Concussion Awareness

Concussion Awareness-Prevention Guidelines

Global is committed to maintain an adequate system to regularly promote a concussion awareness and safety recognition program including but not limited to the online Concussion Course offered by the Center for Disease Control and the HEADS UP to Youth Sports by the Center for Disease Control

Please review the following link that will discuss the symptoms of concussions and what to be on the outlook for prior to attending our camps. All players and parents must review the following documents prior to attending any of our camps.

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/pdfs/highschoolsports/nfl_youngathleteposter_concussion_a-must_read_for_young_athletes.pdf

 http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/pdfs/youthsports/parent_athlete_info_sheet-a.pdf

 http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/pdfs/custom/headsupconcussion_actionplan.pdf

https://youtu.be/AnYNfj-NZqo

We also encourage all parents and players complete the concussion course: http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/youthsports/training/index.html

Global recommends parents or guardians take the following 5 steps if they suspect a participant has a concussion:

1) Remove the athlete from play. Look for signs and symptoms of a concussion if your athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.
2) Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.
3) Record the following information can help health care professionals in assessing the athlete after the injury:
            Cause of the injury and force of the hit or blow to the head or body
            Any loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) and if so, for how long
            Any memory loss immediately following the injury
            Any seizures immediately following the injury
            Number of previous concussions (if any)
4) Review fact sheet on concussion. Parent Fact sheet
5) Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says they are symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play. A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first—usually within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks)—can slow recovery or increase the likelihood of having long-term problems. In rare cases, repeat concussions can result in edema (brain swelling), permanent brain damage, and even death.

 Medical Supervisors on site will be:

Global Vancouver-Brayden Tonogai, CAT

Global Chicago-Karen Hyde- MS, ATC, LAT

Global Las Vegas-Sara Beaudry- MSS, ATC, LAT

“participants” who are suspected of suffering a concussion by our medical supervisor must provide written clearance from a licensed physician before being allowed to return to play.

Information for Athletes
Fact Sheet

Poster
Quiz

Information for Parents
Fact sheet
Magnet
Quiz

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